© 2017 City of Brentwood
1490 Volunteer Parkway
Brentwood, TN 37027
615-946-0389
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The Cool Springs House has a long and colorful history. The house and the land upon which it was originally located was closely associated with the Barfield and Carothers families, both pioneer families in the Brentwood area.

 

Lewis Barfield came to Williamson County in the early 1800's from North Carolina. In 1818, his daughter Penelope married James Carothers, the son of Robert Carothers, who held one of the original Revolutionary War Land Grants in the Brentwood area. The Carothers family prospered, acquiring a large amount of land. James and Penelope Barfield Carothers built the original two log rooms of the Cool Springs House in the 1830’s located at what is presently the intersection of Mallory Lane and Cool Springs Boulevard. At the death of James Carothers, the home was later passed to their son, Dr. Robert Blake Carothers. The first of Robert Carothers’ six wives was Martha Jane Crockett. She was a cousin to Andrew Crockett III who owned the land where the house is currently located in Crockett Park.

 

The log house underwent major additions and renovations in 1870, which is when they added the second story, the downstairs hall, and the front porch. In 1888, the house was deeded to William A. Jordan, who lived there until 1932 when it was bought by the A.M. Gant family. In 1942, Dr. Charles Robinson, a Vanderbilt nutritionist, purchased the house and farm and remained there for 32 years.

 

In 1974, John H. and Karen Dunn Noel bought the house. They did extensive restoration work and were known for their hospitality by hosting many local social events. When the house was sold in 1985, they did so with the provision that the house must be preserved. In 1993, the City of Brentwood assumed ownership when impending development threatened the integrity of the house. The City moved the house to Crockett Park, where it has become the focal point of the park’s history preservation area. 

OUR STORY